MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b
1973

MATRA-SIMCA MS 670B

1973 - 3rd Le Mans / #12 - J.P. Jabouille, J.P. Jaussaud

CA37b

The Matra-Simca MS 670 was a Prototype race car that won the Le Mans 24 Hours 3 times in a row (from 1972 to 1974) as well as the World Manufacturers Championship twice (1973 and 1974). It was designed by Bernard Boyer and Jean-Louis Cassin. A ‘B’ was added in 1973 to the ‘670’ name to indicate that a Porsche gearbox was used as opposed to the previously used ZF. The chassis was an Aluminium monocoque, coupled with a fibreglass body to reduce weight by 22 kg. It was powered by a 60°, 3-litres V12 engine, with aluminium block and head, whose bore and stroke were 79.7*50.0 mm. The Matra V12, named ‘MS 73’, was famous for its amazingly loud sound, and reached 480 CV at 10500 RPM with torque peaking at 320 Nm @ 8400 RPM. In Le Mans it raced with six-in-one exhausts, propelling the car to 320 km/h on the Mulsanne straight. Braking was guaranteed by outboard Girling ventilated discs, all-round. Rims dimensions were 13” x 11” at front and 13” x 17” at rear. The car weighted 693 kg. There were three MS670B racing in Le Mans in 1973, with No.12 driven by Jean-Pierre Jaussaud and Jean-Pierre Jabouille. They finished in third position.

MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b
1974

MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b

1974 - Le Mans Winner / #7 - H. Pescarolo, G.Larrousse

CW18

A Le Mans, nel 1974, le ‘MS 670 B’ iscritte erano tre. Henri Pescarolo e Gérard Larrousse, con la vettura n.7, dominarono la corsa vincendo per il secondo anno consecutivo. The Matra-Simca MS 670 was a Prototype race car that won the Le Mans 24 Hours 3 times in a row (from 1972 to 1974) as well as the World Manufacturers Championship twice (1973 and 1974). The car was designed by Bernard Boyer and Jean-Louis Caussin. The long tail version, designed specifically for Le Mans, was still called ‘670 B’, ‘B’ being the distinctive letter of all Matras fitted with the Porsche 5-speeds gearbox. The chassis was an aluminium monocoque, with fibreglass body. The engine, whose sound was extremely loud, was a 60° 3-litres V12, with aluminium block and heads, 79.7 mm bore and 50.0 mm stroke. The motor version used in ‘74 at Le Mans was ‘MS 73’, with maximum torque of 320 Nm at 8400 RPM , and maximum power of 450 HP at 10500 rpm. On the Mulsanne straight the car could top 320 kph. Brakes had Girling ventilated discs, all-round; in 1974, the rear brakes were moved inboard. Rims dimensions were 13² x 11² at front and 15² x 15² at rear. The car weighted 693 kg. Three were the ‘670 B’s racing in Le Mans in 1974. Number 7 was driven by Henri Pescarolo and Gérard Larrousse who lead the race from start to finish, winning Le Mans for the third time in a row.

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MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b
1973

MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b

1973 - Le Mans Winner / #11 - H. Pescarolo, G.Larrousse

CW21

The Matra vs. Ferrari showdown took place on the Circuit de la Sarthe, on June 9th and 10th, 1973, a day which also marked the 50th anniversary of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The red Ferrari No. 16 driven by Merzario and Pace started from pole and run away in the distance, chased by the blue Matra of Beltoise and Cevert. When, after two hours, the italian leaders developed a fuel piping issue, the Matra No. 10 took their place on the leaderboard, only to be dangerously delayed, and later forced to retire, by tyre issues. At the end of a grueling race, the checquered flag was waved in front of the victorious Matra Simca 670B No.11 of Henry Pescarolo and Gérard Larrousse. The podium was completed by the surviving Ferrari 312 PB n.16 of Merzario and Pace, and finally Matra’s n.12 car of Jabouille and Jaussaud.

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MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b
1973

MATRA-SIMCA MS 670b

1973 - 3rd Le Mans / #12 - J.P. Jabouille, J.P. Jaussaud

CA37b

The Matra-Simca MS 670 was a Prototype race car that won the Le Mans 24 Hours 3 times in a row (from 1972 to 1974) as well as the World Manufacturers Championship twice (1973 and 1974).
It was designed by Bernard Boyer and Jean-Louis Cassin. A ‘B’ was added in 1973 to the ‘670’ name to indicate that a Porsche gearbox was used as opposed to the previously used ZF.
The chassis was an Aluminium monocoque, coupled with a fibreglass body to reduce weight by 22 kg.
It was powered by a 60°, 3-litres V12 engine, with aluminium block and head, whose bore and stroke were 79.7*50.0 mm. The Matra V12, named ‘MS 73’, was famous for its amazingly loud sound, and reached 480 CV at 10500 RPM with torque peaking at 320 Nm @ 8400 RPM. In Le Mans it raced with six-in-one exhausts, propelling the car to 320 km/h on the Mulsanne straight.
Braking was guaranteed by outboard Girling ventilated discs, all-round. Rims dimensions were 13” x 11” at front and 13” x 17” at rear. The car weighted 693 kg.
There were three 670 B racing in Le Mans in 1973, with No.12 driven by Jean-Pierre Jaussaud and Jean-Pierre Jabouille. They finished in third position.

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ALFA ROMEO 33/3
2011

ALFA ROMEO 33/3

2011 - Pocono #5 - J. Nastasi, A. Merzario

CA11m

The Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Sport Prototype was designed in the mid 1960s to race in the World Sports Car Championship. Eventually it succeeded and won the Manufacturers’ Championship in 1975, and again in 1977.
Designed by Carlo Chiti, a famous Italian engineer, the several variants of the car were raced by the Alfa factory and by many privateers as well.
After the initial victories in the 2-litres Prototype category, the ‘T33/3’ version made its debut in 1969 and gained its best results in the 1971 World Championship: the Autodelta ‘open’ Prototypes won the overall ranking at Brands Hatch, Watkins Glen and the Targa Florio, being even faster than the 5-litres ‘Sport’ cars. The ‘T33/3’ cars featured a monocoque chassis, paneled in aluminium and magnesium, a V8 2998 cc engine, and a 6 or 5 speed gearbox. Top speed reached 330 km/h, at Le Mans with long tail. This specific model of the Alfa 33/3 reproduces the car owned by Alfa Romeo collector Joe Nastasi, as it was tested on the Pocono circuit. The same car is often seen at various historic car shows and races, such as the Targa Florio of 2014.

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Ferrari 512M
1971

512M

1971 - Le Mans #16 - C. Craft, D.Weir

CA51a

The Ferrari 512S had failed to beat the Porsche 917s in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship. Despite their higher weight and greater consumption, the car had shown winning potential, but the rushed-in construction had left reliability issues unresolved.
An unusual bad luck struck at Le Mans, where an accident eliminated four of the five 512S in one stroke. For the ending part of the season Ferrari decided to create a lighter and aerodynamically advanced version: thus the 512M (Modified). The new ‘M’ model proved immediately faster than the ‘S’ version, but took its first steps only three weeks before the last Championship race at Österreichring (now Red Bull Ring), where Jacky Ickx led the race until he had to retire due to an alternator failure.
The first victory of the new Ferrari took place in South Africa on 7 November 1970, in a race outside the World Championship, in the hands of Ickx / Giunti who reached the finish line three laps ahead in the Porsche 917K driven by Siffert / Ahrens.
In 1971, however, despite the excellent end of the 1970 season for the 512M, Ferrari decided to concentrate the company’s efforts on a car in line with the 1972 regulations, leaving the 512M to private teams: the 512M, therefore, despite its outstanding performance, could never prove its true value. It remains, however, one of the most beautiful and iconic Sports Prototypes in the history of motorsport.
The CA51a model represents the car of Team David Piper which, driven by Chris Craft and David Weir at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1971. Starting 13th from the grid, the car dropped to 44th place in the 2nd hour of the race but climbed back to an excellent 4th place overall.

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MCLAREN M8D
1970

MCLAREN M8D

1970 - 1st Can-Am Watkins Glen / #5 - Denny Hulme

CA26e

The M8D was a prototype race car, built in 1970 by McLaren Cars to compete in che Can-Am Challenge Cup. In comparison with the former ‘M8’, the M8D was wider and with a lower wing, which was also braced to the chassis, as the high mounted, suspension attached wings had been banned. Chassis was an aluminium sheet monocoque with steel bulkheads and stressed engine. Bodywork was in glass-fibre. The engine was a Chevrolet with Lucas fuel injection, prepared by George Bolthoff; it was a 7.6 litres V8 yielding 680 Hp of maximum power. The transmission was the 4 speeds Hewland LG500. The wheels had a 15 inches diameter, a width of 11 inches at front and 16 inches at rear. Tracks: front 1575 mm, rear 1486 mm. Wheelbase: 2387 mm. Width: 1930 mm. Length: 4166 mm.The overall weight was 634 kg. For the Australian Denny Hulme, Watkins Glen was the first of the many victories (more than half of the races) which led him to win the overall Can-Am 1970 championship.

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CHAPARRAL 2E
1966

CHAPARRAL 2E

1966 - 1st Governor's Trophy & Nassau Tourist Trophy / #65 - Hap Sharp

CA16c

In 1966 Chaparral introduced model 2E for the Can-Am series. With its high mounted wing, clever aerodynamics and rear mounted radiators, it was the car that changed racing, forever. Its best result was at Laguna Seca, where the 2E of Phil Hill won the race and Jim Hall finished second. The wing was mounted to the rear suspension uprights to put the downforce directly into the tires without compressing the suspensions. The wing position could be adjusted, with a foot pedal mechanism, from maximum downforce angle for cornering to minimum drag angle for straightaway. Of all the Chaparrals, this car was Jim Hall’s favourite. This car featured an aluminuium semi-monocoque chassis, and a small block Chevrolet 327 cubic-inch V8 engine. In 1966, at Riverside, in the Can-Am Los Angeles Times Grand Prix, Jim Hall came close to the victory, being slowed by low fuel pressure during the final laps, however he was able to end in second place.

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FORD MKII
1966

FORD MKII

1966 - 3rd Le Mans / #05 - R. Bucknum, D. Hutcherson

CA20c

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FORD GT40
1967

FORD GT40

1967 - 12h Sebring / #19 - N. Vaccarella, U Maglioli

CA18f

The Ford GT40 is one of the most famous cars in Le Mans history, having won the 24-Hour race four times in a row. In 1966 it was with the Mk II version, in 1967 with the Mk IV, in 1968 and 1969 with the first one, Mk I. It was built to compete against Ferrari, who had won Le Mans six times in a row from 1960 to 1965. The development of ‘Mk I’ was carried mainly by Ford Advanced Vehicle in England, joined in 1965 by Carroll Shelby. It was a car built for racing, but also for road circulation; the name ‘GT40’ comes from the height from ground, which is 40 inches. The chassis was a steel semi – monocoque, the body was made of fiberglass. The engine came from the one used on the AC Cobra, with cast-iron block and head: naturally aspired V8, 4.7 litres displacement, 2 valves per cylinder operated by a central camshaft with push-rod; it was coupled with a ZF 5 speeds gearbox. Brakes were provided with vented discs on all the four wheels. This GT40, raced the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1967, driven by N. Vaccarella and U.Maglioli.

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