FORD GT40
1967

FORD GT40

1967 - 12h Sebring / #19 - N. Vaccarella, U Maglioli

CA18f

The Ford GT40 is one of the most famous cars in Le Mans history, having won the 24-Hour race four times in a row. In 1966 it was with the Mk II version, in 1967 with the Mk IV, in 1968 and 1969 with the first one, Mk I. It was built to compete against Ferrari, who had won Le Mans six times in a row from 1960 to 1965. The development of ‘Mk I’ was carried mainly by Ford Advanced Vehicle in England, joined in 1965 by Carroll Shelby. It was a car built for racing, but also for road circulation; the name ‘GT40’ comes from the height from ground, which is 40 inches. The chassis was a steel semi – monocoque, the body was made of fiberglass. The engine came from the one used on the AC Cobra, with cast-iron block and head: naturally aspired V8, 4.7 litres displacement, 2 valves per cylinder operated by a central camshaft with push-rod; it was coupled with a ZF 5 speeds gearbox. Brakes were provided with vented discs on all the four wheels. This GT40, raced the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1967, driven by N. Vaccarella and U.Maglioli.

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NISSAN SKYLINE GT-R
1992

NISSAN SKYLINE GT-R

1992 - 1st Balthurst 1000 #1 - M. Skaufe, J. Richards

CA47d


The GT-R name, used between the 1960s and 1970s, was taken up by Nissan in 1989 for the R-32 model. Powered by a 2,586 cc inline 6-cylinder engine, with four-wheel drive and steering, the R-32 proved monstrously effective on the circuits, so much so that it deserved the nickname of ‘Godzilla’, with good reasons: the model was practically unbeatable in four consecutive editions of the All Japan Touring Cars championship and in the Australian one for three, including two Bathurst 1000 editions (’91 and ’92). It was only a change of regulations which caused the end of its racing career. The Nissan R-32 raced and won often in Gr.3 configuration. Driven by Masahiro Hasemi, it dominated the Guia Race in Macau in 1990, ahead of the BMW M3 and Sierra Cosworth. In 1991 the R-32 was penalized by a mandatory ballast of 150kg, while European cars were allowed to race in DTM configuration, with more powerful engines and wider tires. 
This model reproduces the car which, driven by M. Skaife and J. Richards, won the controversial edition of the Bathurst 1000 in 1992 in Australia.

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ALFA ROMEO 155 V6Ti
ITC 1996

ALFA ROMEO 155 V6Ti

ITC 1996 - Mugello / #18 - Gabriele Tarquini

CA45b

The Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI is a racing car built to race in the DTM (Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft) series in 1993. At that time the German Touring Car Championship was the peak of technology for touring car racing, and it reserved for cars of Class 1 (first division or D1).
In 1995, alongside DTM, the so called ITC – International Touring Car Championship – was also raced. The two series shared the same set of rules.
For the 1995 racing season, Alfa Romeo’s 155 was turned into a more radical car, but to the expense of its reliability.
In 1996, a second more reliable evolution allowed the official driver Nannini to finish third in the Drivers Championship and second in the Manufacturers Championship.

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OPEL CALIBRA V6
ITC Mugello 1996

OPEL CALIBRA V6

ITC Mugello 1996 / #8 - Oliver Gavin

CA36e

The Opel Calibra V6 is a racing car designed to take part in the German DTM (Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft), the German Tourism Car Championship that at the time was the technical pinnacle for touring cars. Racing was restricted to Class 1 (first division or D1) cars. The regulation mandated a maximum capacity of 2,5 liters and a maximum of 6 cylinders, derived from approved models and produced in at least 25,000 specimens. Rules also allowed dramatic changes to the car’s motor and chassis, provided that the body shape was maintained.

Opel entered the last race of 1993 as a test for the real début, which took place the following year with a car which was ready to compete against Alfa Romeo and Mercedes. In 1996, when the championship had already changed its name to ITC, Opel managed to win both the driver’s and the constructor’s championship titles.

This model is decorated after No.8 with which Oliver Gavin raced at Mugello in 1996.

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PORSCHE 956 LH
1983

PORSCHE 956 LH

1983 - Le Mans Winner / #3 - V. Schuppan, H. Haywood, A. Holbert

CW24


The 956 model was created by Porsche in 1982 to compete in the new Group C category. It was replaced in 1985 by the similar 962 model.
It was one of the most successful racing cars ever: it won four 24h Le Mans competitions consecutively, in 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, and the World Car Manufacturer title three times.
The car was powered by a 2.650 cc engine. Its monocoque aluminium chassis was new for Porsche, previously known for their space frame design. Through this change, the regulated minimum weight of 800 Kg was reached.
The victory of the Porsche n.3 of Holbert, Haywood and Schuppan on the n.2 of Ickx and Bell came mainly thanks to the American driver: the loss of a door had damaged the radiator and caused an engine bank to overheat, but Al Holbert, a mechanical engineer, managed to complete the race, despite the smoking engine that seized immediately after the finish line, that he crossed only 17″ ahead of Derek Bell … who in the meantime had run out of fuel. Notice how this edition was dominated by the Porsche 956 with 8 cars in the first 8 positions.

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MERCEDES 190E
DTM 1991

MERCEDES 190E

DTM 1991 - Kyalami / #3 - Roland Asch

CA44d

The Mercedes 190E 2.5-16 Evo II made a triumphant debut, winning all the first three places, in 1992, in the very popular German tourism championship “DTM” – Deutsche Touren Wagen Meisterschaft. The car was developed by AMG starting from a “road” car base, and was built in about 500 units as required by the regulation. Compared to the EVO version the power was increased by 40 Hp. Engine hood, boot lid and spoiler were made of special plastic material. The Evo II raceing debut took place in the northern ring of the Nürburgring in the DTM race on the 16th of June 1990. In the final championship race, on the Hockenheim track, a new car was supplied to all teams. This model reproduces the car with which Roland Asch raced the Yellow Page 200 at Kyalami in the 1991.

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